WHY TO GO TO FRANCE RIGHT NOW | Amy Tara Koch
20405
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WHY TO GO TO FRANCE RIGHT NOW

Yes, there have been multiple terror attacks in France. And strikes. And financial malaise. Which, of course, does not make such an appetizing tourist scenario. And, can almost make you forget the abundant charms of France: the cheese, the wine, the pastry, the way golden light bathes the architecture at sunset, the joie de vivre derived from meandering through Paris, Provence and so many other villages that exude a unique sense of place.

Terror is, unfortunately the new normal. And, it can happen anywhere. Any time. Would I go to Turkey or Syria right now? No. To me, these destinations are truly unstable and dangerous. But, France is still France. Maybe even better.

Here are 7 reasons why you should visit France right now.

  • The exchange rate, essentially 1:1, makes prices seem almost reasonable. Now, a stay at a five star hotel (Le Bristol, Plaza Athenee, Le Royal Monceau), while still pricey, is more accessible. Dinners out won’t leave you hyperventilating. A coffee is $3, not $7.
  • Fewer crowds mean easier dinner reservations. Where spots like  Paul Bert and Jean Francois Arpege Clover are usually impenetrable, I easily made reservations at both.
  • Fewer crowds translate into a less obnoxious wait time at museums. And, less of a chance that you may be trampled by selfie stick wielding idiots.
  • It’s “Soldes” time in France right now. Profit of this this biannual sale (up to 75% off)  across the board for fashion, home goods, foods and more.
  • You can have a cocktail at the hyper chic newly restored Hotel Ritz in Paris.
  • More, now than ever, you can afford to take the TGV down to Provence and shack up at the storied Hotel  du Cap-Eden-Roc in Antibes
  • With reduced tourism, the French may actually be happy to see you.